Book Review | The Price Guide to the Occult by Leslye Walton

The Price Guide to the Occult by Leslye Walton
Published by: Candlewick Press on March 13th, 2018
Genre: Fiction, YA, Paranormal, Witches
Pages: 288
Format: Hardcover
Source: Purchased

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Summary (from Goodreads): From the author of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender comes a haunting maelstrom of magic and murder in the lush, moody Pacific Northwest.

When Rona Blackburn landed on Anathema Island more than a century ago, her otherworldly skills might have benefited friendlier neighbors. Guilt and fear instead led the island’s original eight settlers to burn “the witch” out of her home. So Rona cursed them. Fast-forward one hundred–some years: All Nor Blackburn wants is to live an unremarkable teenage life. She has reason to hope: First, her supernatural powers, if they can be called that, are unexceptional. Second, her love life is nonexistent, which means she might escape the other perverse side effect of the matriarch’s backfiring curse, too. But then a mysterious book comes out, promising to cast any spell for the right price. Nor senses a storm coming and is pretty sure she’ll be smack in the eye of it. In her second novel, Leslye Walton spins a dark, mesmerizing tale of a girl stumbling along the path toward self-acceptance and first love, even as the Price Guide’s malevolent author — Nor’s own mother — looms and threatens to strangle any hope for happiness. Continue reading

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Monthly Wrap Up | April 2018

I really got to start posting on my blog more! Below are all the books that I read in April. A lot of great books this month. I got to pick up on series that I’ve started. Work has still been pretty busy and when I get home I really don’t want to do anything else but with this change in weather I’m feeling more motivated to pick things up again. I hope one of those things is posting regular book reviews on here! How do you manage your time?

# of books read: 6

# of pages read: 2,284

Average book length: 380.6 pages

Goodreads 2018 Challenge: 22/75 Continue reading

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Book Review | The Oracle Year by Charles Soule

The Oracle Year by Charles Soule
Published by: Harper Perennial on April 3rd, 2018
Genre: Fiction, Science Fiction
Pages: 416
Format: Paperback ARC
Source: Provided by my lovely friend at Harper Collins CA

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Summary (from Goodreads): From bestselling comic-book franchise writer Charles Soule comes a clever and witty first novel of a twentysomething New Yorker who wakes up one morning with the power to predict the future—perfect for fans of Joe Hill and Brad Meltzer, or books like This Book Is Full of Spiders and Welcome to Night Vale.

Knowledge is power. So when an unassuming Manhattan bassist named Will Dando awakens from a dream one morning with 108 predictions about the future in his head, he rapidly finds himself the most powerful man in the world. Protecting his anonymity by calling himself the Oracle, he sets up a heavily guarded Web site with the help of his friend Hamza to selectively announce his revelations. In no time, global corporations are offering him millions for exclusive access, eager to profit from his prophecies.

He’s also making a lot of high-powered enemies, from the President of the United States and a nationally prominent televangelist to a warlord with a nuclear missile and an assassin grandmother. Legions of cyber spies are unleashed to hack the Site—as it’s come to be called—and the best manhunters money can buy are deployed not only to unmask the Oracle but to take him out of the game entirely. With only a handful of people he can trust—including a beautiful journalist—it’s all Will can do to simply survive, elude exposure, and protect those he loves long enough to use his knowledge to save the world.

Delivering fast-paced adventure on a global scale as well as sharp-witted satire on our concepts of power and faith, Marvel writer Charles Soule’s audacious debut novel takes readers on a rollicking ride where it’s impossible to predict what will happen next. Continue reading

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Monthly Wrap Up | March 2018

I may not be posting that much on my blog as much as I’d like but I am still reading! Work is super busy and the weather is still cold and blah here. I read 1 more book than I did last month and as of April 8th I’ve almost completed 3 books. Go me.

# of books read: 6

# of pages read: 2,162

Average book length: 360.3 pages

Goodreads 2018 Challenge: 16/75 Continue reading

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Book Review | How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran

How to Build a Girl: A Novel by Caitlin Moran
Published by: Harper on September 23rd, 2014
Genre: YA, Feminism, Humor, Contemporary
Pages: 368
Format: eBook
Source: Purchased for the Kobo

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Summary (from Goodreads): The New York Times bestselling author hailed as “the UK’s answer to Tina Fey, Chelsea Handler, and Lena Dunham all rolled into one” (Marie Claire) makes her fiction debut with a hilarious yet deeply moving coming of age novel.

What do you do in your teenage years when you realize what your parents taught you wasn’t enough? You must go out and find books and poetry and pop songs and bad heroes—and build yourself.

It’s 1990. Johanna Morrigan, fourteen, has shamed herself so badly on local TV that she decides that there’s no point in being Johanna anymore and reinvents herself as Dolly Wilde—fast-talking, hard-drinking Gothic hero and full-time Lady Sex Adventurer. She will save her poverty-stricken Bohemian family by becoming a writer—like Jo in Little Women, or the Bröntes—but without the dying young bit.

By sixteen, she’s smoking cigarettes, getting drunk and working for a music paper. She’s writing pornographic letters to rock-stars, having all the kinds of sex with all kinds of men, and eviscerating bands in reviews of 600 words or less.

But what happens when Johanna realizes she’s built Dolly with a fatal flaw? Is a box full of records, a wall full of posters, and a head full of paperbacks, enough to build a girl after all?

Imagine The Bell Jar written by Rizzo from Grease. How to Build a Girl is a funny, poignant, and heartbreakingly evocative story of self-discovery and invention, as only Caitlin Moran could tell it. Continue reading

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Book Review | The Wicked Deep by Shea Ernshaw

The Wicked Deep by Shea Ernshaw
Published by: Simon Pulse on March 6th, 2018
Genre: YA, Paranormal, Witches
Pages: 322
Format: Electronic ARC
Source: Provided by Simon and Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review

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Summary (from Goodreads): Welcome to the cursed town of Sparrow…

Where, two centuries ago, three sisters were sentenced to death for witchery. Stones were tied to their ankles and they were drowned in the deep waters surrounding the town.

Now, for a brief time each summer, the sisters return, stealing the bodies of three weak-hearted girls so that they may seek their revenge, luring boys into the harbor and pulling them under.

Like many locals, seventeen-year-old Penny Talbot has accepted the fate of the town. But this year, on the eve of the sisters’ return, a boy named Bo Carter arrives; unaware of the danger he has just stumbled into.

Mistrust and lies spread quickly through the salty, rain-soaked streets. The townspeople turn against one another. Penny and Bo suspect each other of hiding secrets. And death comes swiftly to those who cannot resist the call of the sisters.

But only Penny sees what others cannot. And she will be forced to choose: save Bo, or save herself.

Continue reading

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Book Review | Bachelor Girl by Kim Van Alkemade

Bachelor Girl by Kim Van Alkemade
Published by: Touchstone on March 6th, 2018
Genre: Fiction, Historical Fiction. LGBTQ
Pages: 416
Format: Paperback ARC
Source: Provided by Simon and Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review

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Summary (from Goodreads): From the New York Times bestselling author of Orphan #8 comes a fresh and intimate novel in the vein of Lilac Girls and The Alice Network about the destructive power of secrets and the redemptive power of love—inspired by the true story of Jacob Ruppert, the millionaire owner of the New York Yankees, and his mysterious bequest in 1939 to an unknown actress, Helen Winthrope Weyant.

When the owner of the New York Yankees baseball team, Colonel Jacob Ruppert, takes Helen Winthrope, a young actress, under his wing, she thinks it’s because of his guilt over her father’s accidental death—and so does Albert Kramer, Ruppert’s handsome personal secretary. Helen and Albert develop a deepening bond the closer they become to Ruppert, an eccentric millionaire who demands their loyalty in return for his lavish generosity.

New York in the Jazz Age is filled with possibilities, especially for the young and single. Yet even as Helen embraces being a “bachelor girl”—a working woman living on her own terms—she finds herself falling in love with Albert, even after he confesses his darkest secret. When Ruppert dies, rumors swirl about his connection to Helen after the stunning revelation that he has left her the bulk of his fortune, which includes Yankee Stadium. But it is only when Ruppert’s own secrets are finally revealed that Helen and Albert will be forced to confront the truth about their relationship to him—and to each other.

Inspired by factual events that gripped New York City in its heyday, Bachelor Girl is a hidden history gem about family, identity, and love in all its shapes and colors. Continue reading

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